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Health

Living near a ‘food swamp’ could raise stroke risk in adults 50 and older: research

Adults ages 50 and older who live near fast food-dense environments may be at heightened risk of stroke, preliminary research has determined.

So-called “food swamps” typically contain an abundance of fast-food chains and convenience stores — essentially “swamping” neighborhoods with unhealthy eating options, the authors explained.

Meanwhile, food swamps also often overlap with food deserts, where insufficient grocery stores complicate the quest to find fresh produce, they added.

“An unhealthy diet negatively impacts blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels that increases the risk of stroke,” lead author Dixon Yang, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, said in a statement.

“Independent of one’s own demographics or socioeconomic status, living in a neighborhood with an abundance of poor food choices may be an important factor to consider for many people,” Yang added.

To determine the connection between food swamp density and stroke risk, the researchers performed a secondary analysis of data collected from 2010 to 2016 on 17,875 adults.

The initial data came from the University of Michigan’s ongoing Health and Retirement Study, which recruits participants across the US to explore the challenges and opportunities associated with aging.

The researchers then cross-referenced this information with food environment details from the US Department of Agriculture, to create a so-called “retail food environment index.”

The index, they explained, indicates the ratio of unhealthy food options to the number of healthy choices in each neighborhood.

Unhealthy food options included convenience stores, fast-food and full-service restaurants, while healthy food retailers included grocery stores, farmer’s markets and specialized food stores, according to the report.

The areas with more unhealthy choices generally had a ratio of higher than five, while those with healthier options had a ratio of five or lower.

“Prior research has shown that a retail food environment index ratio of five or higher may predict the prevalence of people with obesity in a neighborhood,” Yang said.

Yang and his colleagues then weighted the 17,875 adults to be representative of a much larger US population of more than 84 million community-dwelling adults.

More than 3 million people — or 3.8 percent of those studied — self-reported having experienced a stroke, the scientists found.

About 28 percent of those surveyed lived in areas with a retail food environment index below five — the areas with healthier options.

The remaining 72 percent lived in regions ranked five or higher on the index, according to the research.

Those who lived in the neighborhoods with less healthy options had 13 percent greater odds of stroke in comparison to residents of areas that ranked below five, the authors found.

The scientists acknowledged several limits in their research, including the single time period evaluated and the fact that stroke events were self-reported.

In addition, the research is still in preliminary stages — to be presented at next week’s American Stroke Association conference — and has yet to be peer reviewed.

“At this early stage of our research, it’s important to raise awareness that a person’s neighborhood and food environment are potentially important factors affecting their health,” Yang said.

“In the future, it may help to focus on community-based interventions or dietary guidance to improve cardiovascular health, thereby, hopefully reducing the risk of stroke,” he added.

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Health

Ozempic And Wegovy: What To Know About Semaglutide Weight Loss Drugs

A new class of weight loss drugs on the market have been making waves since they were authorized as a treatment for obesity in 2021. Semaglutide injections, which you may know as Wegovy or Ozempic, have become wildly popular over the past several months, thanks to the buzz they’ve received from TikTok influencers (and rumors of use among some celebrities).

The prescription injections were introduced as a diabetes treatment in 2017but people soon realized that the medications — which help people with diabetes to manage their blood sugar levels — also led to significant weight loss in people with obesity who’d struggled to lose weight with other treatments.

From there, interest in the drugs grew, and after clinical trials confirmed what people suspected — that semaglutide injections help people lose weight — demand soared, so much so that pharmacies across the country are experiencing shortages in both Wegovy and Ozempic. Obesity specialists understand the hype; this kind of prescription weight loss medication has been a long time coming.

“For those of us who treat obesity, this is a game-changer we’ve never seen before,” said Dr. Dan Azagury, a bariatric surgeon at Stanford Health Care. “This is the first time ever that we have really effective drugs to treat obesity.”

obesity is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the United States, but until recently, we haven’t had very effective drugs to address the health complications it’s commonly linked to, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Aside from lifestyle changes like diet and exercise, the go-to intervention for obesity has been surgery (think: gastric bypass or the duodenal switch).

According to Azagury, many obesity specialists noticed that, in the wake of receiving bariatric surgery, many patients were suddenly no longer diabetic. Upon investigating the reason for this, researchers identified new gut hormones, including one called glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), that reacted to food going into the gut.

Further testing revealed that GLP-1, which increases after bariatric surgery, improves blood sugar levels, and consequently helps with diabetes. “That’s why major diabetes goes away within days of surgery,” Azagury said.

After this discovery, pharmaceutical companies set out to form a diabetes drug that could activate those GLP-1 receptors. That’s what led to the development of semaglutidea synthetic compound that mimics the effects of GLP-1 ― and later the semaglutide-based diabetes drug Ozempic, which got approval from the Food and Drug Administration in 2017.

The other key finding about GLP-1: It slows down digestion and reduces food intake, according to Dr. Janelle Duah, a Yale Medicine Internist. This is why Ozempicwhich is intended for diabetes, has been and continues to be prescribed off-label for weight loss, Azagury said.

The weight loss effects of GLP-1 (which are revved up through semaglutide), combined with the wild demand for Ozempic, drove the drug manufacturer, Novo Nordisk, to create a very similar drug specifically for weight loss: Wegovy. Essentially just a stronger dosage of Ozempic, Wegovy got FDA approved in June 2021.

Who’s a candidate for the drugs?

Wegovy, a once-a-week shot, is for adults who have a body mass index over 30, or who have a BMI above 27 with at least one weight-related health issue (think: high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol). It’s also meant to supplement physical activity and dietary changes, which is why obesity specialists like Azagury recommend that patients work with a comprehensive team of providers, including dietitians and therapists, if they can afford to. Patients can get the prescription through their primary care doctor, too.

Many people find that the injections help them feel fuller longer and reduce sugary cravings. It “makes them crave protein and fiber more — thus helping them stick to diet changes that can further enhance their weight loss,” Duah said. Some people say it also reduced their desire to drink alcohol, and helped them to get better sleep.

Ozempic is approved for Type 2 diabetes, not obesity or weight loss, although people are getting it off-label for weight loss purposes. It’s entirely legal for doctors to prescribe meds off-label, but this is likely adding to ongoing drug shortages — which is a major issue for people with diabetes who can’t get hold of the medications.

Obesity doctors are excited that there’s finally a medication to help people, but there are some barriers and side effects to note.

What’s the overall take on these weight loss medications?

Obesity doctors are thrilled. Often, people retain weight because of health problems out of their control, not for lack of willpower or discipline. Many patients with obesity have tried it all, only to see minimal results. “Now we have something to help them,” Azagury said.

According to Duah, the recent surge in prescriptions, for the most part, is for good reason. “It is by far the most efficacious weight loss medication on the market, with users losing up to 20% of their starting body weight,” Duah said.

And even though interest in these drugs is soaring, Azagury thinks they can help still more people. The original class of obesity drugs from the 1960s and ’70s had nasty consequences and likely soured many people on the whole idea. It might take some convincing for more people to accept that there’s finally an effective drug for weight loss available, Azagury said.

There’s also the issue of cost. These drugs aren’t always covered by insurance, Azagury said, so it can get expensive (to the tune of $1,500 to $1,800 a month). “That is the biggest challenge people will face,” Azagury said. “It’s FDA-approved; that doesn’t mean insurance is going to pay for it.”

According to Duah, this is one of the main reasons providers end up prescribing Ozempic instead. Unlike Wegovy, Ozempic is often covered for diabetes or insulin resistance, so patients looking for semaglutide injections can get access to them at a reasonable price.

There are some risks associated with semaglutide injections

As with any drug, there are risks — but the injections are surprisingly well tolerated, Azagury said. The most common side effects are gastrointestinal issues, like nausea, vomiting, constipation, gas and heartburn. These GI-related side effects should subsidy as your body gets used to the injections; until then, they can mostly be handled by eating smaller, more frequent meals or taking over-the-counter medications like bismuth subsalicylate or heartburn relief tablets, Duah said. (If the side effects persist, be sure to talk to your doctor about finding relief or other, more tolerable options.)

In rare cases, semaglutide injections can lead to thyroid tumors, which can be cancerous. Other serious potential side effects include pancreatitis, gallbladder problems, low blood sugar, kidney issues, allergic reactions and depression. The injections also shouldn’t be used with other drugs that contain semaglutide or that target GLP-1 receptors.

We’re still learning about long-term side effects, since the drug is relatively new. The injections aren’t a quick fix, and most people will have to stay on the medications for at least a year (and likely longer) to meet their weight loss goals and improve their health, according to Azagury. One study found that many people who stop taking the medications rapidly gain the weight back, supporting the growing belief that the injections are meant to be taken for the long haul.

Other than a slightly higher risk of gallstones (which is common with many types of rapid weight loss), we haven’t seen any long-term effects with liraglutide, a similar drug that’s been on the market since 2010. Azagury expects the same will be true with semaglutide-based medications, given their similarity ― but, of course, time will tell.

If you’re interested in semaglutide injections, talk to your doctor. Understand the risks and benefits, and keep in mind that due to inflation, supply issues and growing demand, these drugs tend to be back-ordered — often for the people who need them most. Hopefully, supply will ramp up soon and more insurers will cover the cost. That, Duah said, will help more people get the drugs at a fair price.

“If insurances covered weight loss medications like Wegovy and supply was increased, we wouldn’t be seeing these issues with keeping Ozempic stocked on our pharmacies’ shelves,” Duah said.

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Health

‘Reverse Diet’ Is Not a Weight Loss Cheat Code

Photo: Lolostock (Shutterstock)

To hear the TikTok girlies tell it, there’s a hack that will let you EAT MORE FOOD! While NOT GAINING WEIGHT! And it’s great if you are SICK OF DIETING! Never mind that one can achieve all those goals by a simple trick called “not dieting anymore.” No, it needs a name and a strict protocol: reverse dieting.

The basic idea of ​​reverse dieting is that you slowly add a few more calories to your diet every week. So s you normally maintain your weight on 2,000 calories per day, but you’ve been eating 1,500 calories to lose weight. You might then “reverse diet” by eating 1,600 calories a day next week, 1,700 calories a day the week after that, and so on. Eventually you’ll be back up to 2,000 calories, or maybe even more.

This is not a trend that originated on TikTok. The term seems to have come from bodybuilders, whose sport requires that they engage in extreme cycles of bulking (gaining weight to gain muscle mass) and cutting (losing as much fat as possible before stepping on a stage). While the process can create dazzling physiques, it also fucks with your metabolism and overall health.

Reverse dieting is one approach for transitioning from an extreme cut, to maintenance or bulking: Instead of just pigging out the day after your bodybuilding show, you might rather slowly increase the amount of food you eat as you find your maintenance calories again.

This idea spawned the current trend of influencers pitching reverse dieting as the cure for all your diet-related complaints. But it doesn’t work that way.

The science behind reverse dieting

Some of the claims you’ll hear from thin women flexing their abs on TikTok, and from the bodybuilders saying to just trust them, bro, are true. Among them:

  • Your metabolism adapts to dieting, so over time you have to eat less and less food to keep losing weight (this is a known thing).
  • After dieting a long time, you may be eating a miserably low number of calories.
  • Eating more food will allow your body to stop being so stingy with the calories, and can increase the number of calories your body burns.
  • After increasing your calories, someday you may be able to lose weight again while eating more food than when you were in the depths of your diet.

There are also a number of untruths and half-truths that come up. You may hear that increasing your calories too fast after a diet will make your body pack on fat, or that you can add 1,000 calories and still be losing weight, or something something hormones something cortisol. (Scroll long enough on fitness TikTok and somebody will explain that all your problems are due to cortisol. Take a drink.)

In any case, this is where “reverse dieting” comes in. Supposedly the cure to all of these ills is simply that you need to add 50 to 100 calories to your diet each week. The process is slow and requires patience, but stick to it and you too could look like this girl (imagine me moving my head to point at the before-and-after photos I’ve greenscreened behind me) on 2,400 calories instead of 1,200.

So what’s actually true about reverse dieting, and why is everybody so into it? Let’s take a closer look.

When it goes right, “reverse dieting” is just “not dieting” but with more rules

After reading all of those bullet points above, you might think, OK, so why not just stop dieting? You’ll get to eat more food, your body will burn more calories, and from there you can either diet again or—crazy idea here—just not diet anymore. Heck, you could give gaining weight a try.

And that is, in fact, the real answer. Just stop dieting. The world will not end. You can eat food again, and you will be fine. So why reverse diet?

As Eric Trexler, a nutrition and metabolism researcher, put it herethe original reverse dieters’ goal was to smoothly transition from a calorie deficit, to maintenance, to their first bulk after a bodybuilding contest without gaining any more fat than they needed to. One problem with this approach is that after bodybuilders diet that hard, they need to regain fat. You can’t stay dangerously lean forever, and that’s true whether you’re a meathead or a TikTok girlie.

On social media, reverse dieting is often described as a way of continuing to diet while eating more calories. It’s true that if you’re in a 500 calorie deficit and you’re only adding 50 calories a week, you’ll continue to be in a deficit for a very long time—10 weeks, at that rate. Trexler notes that “this would serve only to delay even the most basic and immediate aspects of recovery, and make [the dieter’s] life unnecessarily difficult.”

Reverse dieting is not a cure for chronic dieting

There are two things going on here, I think. One is relatively harmless. Land’s say you’ve been on a diet and you’re ready to start gaining weight. Instead of eating an extra 1000 calories each day (to go from a 500 calorie deficit to a 500 calorie surplus), you can eat an extra few hundred this week, and add a few hundred more next week, and so on. You’ll be less surprised by changes in your weight (eating more food means there’s more food in your belly, so the scale might tick up a bit just from that) and it may be easier to figure out approximately how many calories you should eat going forward.

But that’s not how it’s being described on social media. Thin women are telling chronic dieters that they can eat more food while continuing to be very thin, if only they follow a strict reverse dieting protocol. But the strictness and the expectations can be damaging on their own.

For an extreme example, check out this video from a registered dietitian and eating disorder specialist. She describes a woman who was getting help for eating disorder recovery. The woman had such a low body weight, with associated health issues, that the dietitian says she “needs[ed] to gain weight immediately.” But instead of following guidance from her care team that would have her gaining a pound a week, she secretly put herself on a reverse diet protocol. By adding just 50 calories each week to the too-low amount she was already eating, it took her three months to gain a whole pound of body mass—basically delaying her recovery by three months.

And here’s where I think we need to take a closer look at why reverse dieting posts are so popular in corners of social media that are focused on weight loss. While eating more sounds healthier—it’s a good start!—following a strict reverse diet is just another way of restricting.

Reverse dieting is sometimes just a way to restrict more

Let’s say, as in many of the examples on TikTok, that you are somebody currently eating 1,200 calories (officially a starvation diet) and no longer losing weight. Even if you are a small woman who never exercises—maybe because you don’t have the energy?—a healthy amount of daily calories will likely be 1,600 or more. So you’re supposed to eat 1,250 next week? And then 1,300 the week after that? At that rate, it would take eight weeks to get you up to the number that should be mere maintenance for you. Even if you don’t have an eating disorder, you’re creating the same problem for yourself as the ED patient in the dietitian’s case study.

What’s even more concerning to me is that 50 or even 100 calories is an extremely precise amount. If I’m aiming to eat 2,000 calories a day, maybe some days I’ll have 1,950 and some days I’ll have 2,100. Over time it balances out. But if you’re trying to hit exactly 1,850 and not 1,900 (because 1,900 is next week’s target) you’ll have to track your food meticulously. This is the kind of lifestyle where you’ll be weighing your toast before and after you spread the peanut butter, and you won’t want to eat at a restaurant, because how many calories are in each menu item? What if they’re heavy handed with the sauce?

In my scroll through #reversedieting TikTok, I found women saying that they had to miss out on family meals and deal with concern from their friends during their reverse diet. Clearly, they have not taken a step very far out of diet-land. For these folks, it actually seems like the “reverse” is essentially a way of extending their diet. You could be eating at maintenance for those eight weeks, but you’re restricting instead. And then what? Reverse dieting is often described as a way of increasing your calorie burn so you can diet again.

Even when the influencers show themselves gaining muscle and eating genuinely healthy numbers of calories (assuming that the numbers they cite are true), it’s still all couched in language around leanness and thinness, and features photos of their abs. Prioritizing leanness even while gaining muscle is some backwards-ass shit. It’s okay to not be able to see your abs while you are trying to make yourself bigger. As strongman JF Caron famously put it, “abs is not a thing of power. Is just a sign you don’t eat enough.”

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Health

Weight loss surgery extends lives, study finds



CNN

Weight loss surgery reduces the risk of premature death, especially from such obesity-related conditions as cancer, diabetes and heart disease, according to a new 40-year study of nearly 22,000 people who had bariatric surgery in Utah.

Compared with those of similar weight, people who underwent one of four types of weight loss surgery were 16% less likely to die from any cause, the study found. The drop in deaths from diseases triggered by obesity, such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes, was even more dramatic.

“Deaths from cardiovascular disease decreased by 29%, while deaths from various cancers decreased by 43%, which is pretty impressive,” said lead author Ted Adams, an adjunct associate professor in nutrition and integrative physiology at the University of Utah’s School of Medicine.

“There was also a huge percentage drop — a 72% decline — in deaths related to diabetes in people who had surgery compared to those who did not,” he said. One significant downside: The study also found younger people who had the surgery were at higher risk for suicide.

The study, published Wednesday in the journal Obesity, reinforces similar findings from earlier research, including a 10-year study in Sweden that found significant reductions in premature deaths, said Dr. Eduardo Grunvald, a professor of medicine and medical director of weight management program at the University of California San Diego Health.

The Swedish study also found a significant number of people were in remission from diabetes at both two years and 10 years after surgery.

“This new research from Utah is more evidence that people who undergo these procedures have positive, beneficial long-term outcomes,” said Grunvald, who coauthored the American Gastroenterological Association’s new guidelines on obesity treatment.

The association strongly recommends patients with obesity use recently approved weight loss medications or surgery paired with lifestyle changes.

“And the key for patients is to know that changing your diet becomes more natural, more easy to do after you have bariatric surgery or take the new weight loss medications,” said Grunvald, who was not involved in the Utah study.

“While we don’t yet fully understand why, these interventions actually change the chemistry in your brain, making it much easier to change your diet afterwards.”

Despite the benefits though, only 2% of patients who are eligible for bariatric surgery ever get it, often due to the stigma about obesity, said Dr. Caroline Apovian, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and codirector of the Center for Weight Management and Wellness at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Apovian was the lead author for the Endocrine Society’s clinical practice guidelines for the pharmacological management of obesity.

Insurance carriers typically cover the cost of surgery for people over 18 with a body mass index of 40 or higher, or a BMI of 35 if the patient also has a related condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure, she said.

“I see patients with a BMI of 50, and invariably I will say, ‘You’re a candidate for everything — medication, diet, exercise and surgery.’ And many tell me, ‘Don’t talk to me about surgery. I don’t want it.’ They don’t want a surgical solution to what society has told them is a failure of willpower,” she said.

“We don’t torture people who have heart disease: ‘Oh, it’s because you ate all that fast food.’ We don’t torture people with diabetes: ‘Oh, it’s because you ate all that cake.’ We tell them they have a disease, and we treat it. Obesity is a disease, too, yet we torture people with obesity by telling them it’s their fault.”

Most of the people who choose bariatric surgery — around 80% — are women, Adams said. One of the strengths of the new study, he said, was the inclusion of men who had undergone the procedure.

“For all-causes of death, the mortality was reduced by 14% for females and by 21% for males,” Adams said. In addition, deaths from related causes, such as heart attack, cancer and diabetes, were 24% lower for females and 22% lower for males who underwent surgery compared with those who did not, he said.

Four types of surgery performed between 1982 and 2018 were examined in the study: gastric bypass, gastric banding, gastric sleeve and duodenal switch.

Gastric bypass, developed in the late 1960s, creates a small pouch near the top of the stomach. A part of the small intestine is brought up and attached to that point, bypassing most of the stomach and the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine.

In gastric banding, an elastic band that can be tightened or loosened is placed around the top portion of the stomach, thus restricting the volume of food entering the stomach cavity. Because gastric banding is not as successful in creating long-term weight loss, the procedure “is not as popular today,” Adams said.

“The gastric sleeve is a procedure where essentially about two-thirds of the stomach is removed laparoscopically,” he said. “It takes less time to perform, and food still passes through the much-smaller stomach. It’s become a very popular option.”

The duodenal switch is typically reserved for patients who have a high BMI, Adams added. It’s a complicated procedure that combines a sleeve gastrectomy with an intestinal bypass, and is effective for type 2 diabetes, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

One alarming finding of the new study was a 2.4% increase in deaths by suicide, primarily among people who had bariatric surgery between the ages of 18 and 34.

“That’s because they are told that life is going to be great after surgery or medication,” said Joann Hendelman, clinical director of the National Alliance for Eating Disorders, a nonprofit advocacy group.

“All you have to do is lose weight, and people are going to want to hang out with you, people will want to be your friend, and your anxiety and depression are going to be gone,” she said. “But that’s not reality.”

In addition, there are postoperative risks and side effects associated with bariatric surgery, such as nausea, vomiting, alcoholism, a potential failure to lose weight or even weight gain, said Susan Vibbert, an advocate at Project HEAL, which provides help for people struggling with eating disorders.

“How are we defining health in these scenarios? And is there another intervention — a weight neutral intervention?” Vibbert asked.

Past research has also shown an association between suicide risk and bariatric surgery, Grunvald said, but studies on the topic are not always able to determine a patient’s mental history.

“Did the person opt for surgery because they had some unrealistic expectations or underlying psychological disorders that were not resolved after the surgery? Or is this a direct effect somehow of bariatric surgery? We can’t answer that for sure,” he said.

Intensive presurgery counseling is typically required for all who undergo the procedure, but it may not be enough, Apovian said. She lost her first bariatric surgery patient to suicide.

“She was older, in her 40s. She had surgery and lost 150 pounds. And then she put herself in front of a bus and died because she had underlying bipolar disorder she had been self-medicating with food,” Apovian said. “We as a society use a lot of food to hide trauma. What we need in this country is more psychological counseling for everybody, not just for people who undergo bariatric surgery.”

Managing weight is a unique process for each person, a mixture of genetics, culture, environment, social stigma and personal health, experts say. There is no one solution for all.

“First, we as a society must consider obesity as a disease, as a biological problem, not as a moral failing,” Grunvald said. “That’s my first piece of advice.

“And if you believe your life is going to benefit from treatment, then consider evidence-based treatment, which studies show are surgery or medications, if you haven’t been able to successfully do it with lifestyle changes alone.”

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Health

Midriff bulge linked to later physical decline, study says

Editor’s Note: Seek advice from a health care provider prior to starting a workout program.



CNN

If you are a man or woman approaching 50, look down at your middle. If you’re like many people, you might have to lean over a bit to see your feet. Yes, it’s the dreadful midriff bulge — that expanding waistline that can often creep up on you as you age, much like a receding hairline or extra wrinkles.

Tough to combat, it almost seems like a rite of passage, just part of the cycle of life, right? But a new study has found that allowing your middle to expand will do more than send you shopping for the next size up in britches — it can also harm your physical abilities later in life.

The study, which followed 4,509 people who were 45 years old or older in Norway for over two decades, found participants who had a high or moderately high waist circumference at the start of the study were 57% more likely to be “frail” than those with a normal waistline.

But frailty is not that “tottering” elderly person bent over a cane that comes to mind. Instead, frailty includes a poor grip strength, a slower walking speed, overall exhaustion, unintentional weight loss and low physical activity.

People who were obese at the start of the study, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 and higher, were also 2.5 more likely to be frail than those with normal BMI (18.5 to 24.9), according to the study published January 23, 2023, in the journal BMJ Open.

There could be several reasons, according to study authors. Obesity leads to an increase in inflammation in fat cells, which can damage muscle fibers “resulting in reduced muscle strength and function,” study coauthor Shreeshti Uchai, a doctoral research fellow in nutritional epidemiology at the University of Oslo in Tromsø, Norway, and her colleagues wrote.

The results highlight the need to stay on top of both overall weight gain and any rise in waist circumference, and to broaden the definition of frailty, the authors concluded.

“In the context where the population is rapidly aging and the obesity epidemic is rising, growing evidence recognizes the subgroup of ‘fat and frail’ older individuals in contrast to viewing frailty only as a wasting disorder,” they wrote.

Exercise can help counter the growing frailty that aging may bring. Adults should perform muscle-strengthening exercises involving all major muscle groups on at least two or more days each week, in addition to exercising at least two hours and 30 minutes per week at a moderate intensity, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services ‘ physical activity guidelines for Americans.

Reducing body fat and building lean muscle can help improve balance and posture, Dr. Nieca Goldberg, the medical director of Atria New York City and clinical associate professor of medicine at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine, told CNN previously.

To stay strong and healthy, try to do both aerobics and strength exercises.

They “appear to work together and help each other move toward better outcomes,” said Dr. William Roberts, a professor in the department of family medicine and community health at the University of Minnesota Medical School. “A balanced program of strength and aerobic activity is probably best and probably more closely mimics the activities of our ancestors, which helped determine our current gene sets.”

To get started on strength exercises, CNN fitness contributor Dana Santas, a mind-body coach in professional sports, suggests mastering body-weight movements first before moving on to free weights.

LBB bodyweight 03

Try this 10-minute body-weight workout

Get all the details of these exercises and more by signing up for CNN’s Fitness, But Better newsletter series, a seven-part expert-backed guide that can help you ease into a healthy routine.

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Movies

“The Whale” and the Fat Suit

The new film “The Whale,” which A24 will release on Friday, is about a man named Charlie. He lives alone in a squalid apartment in Idaho, grieving a male lover, and is estranged from his ex-wife and teen daughter. His only companions are a nurse and a young evangelist who shows up at his doorstep. Charlie teaches an online essay-writing course, but he keeps his computer camera off out of shame, because he weighs around six hundred pounds.

Charlie is played by Brendan Fraser, beneath folds of photorealistic prosthetic fat. When I saw the film at the Toronto International Film Festival, in September, Fraser came onstage afterward, alongside the director, Darren Aronofsky, to an avalanche of applause. At fifty-three, Fraser was heavier than in his heartthrob days, though nothing close to his character in “The Whale.” He seemed almost befuddled to be embraced so warmly, after years of neglect from Hollywood. In a 2018 QG profile titled “What Ever Happened to Brendan Fraser?,” he described falling into a depression after being groped by Philip Berk, the former president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. (Berk denied the allegation.) The support for Fraser in Toronto was palpable, and he now stands at the front of the Academy’s Best Actor race, with two time-tested Oscar narratives behind him: the comeback and the deglamorizing “transformation.”

But, as endearing as Fraser was, the lovefest left me uneasy. I wasn’t alone. “This is a mighty act of becoming, the film seems to insist—and also one of empathy,” Vanity Fair’s Richard Lawson wrote, of Fraser’s onscreen transformation. “But what’s expressed instead is a kind of leering horror, a portrait of a man gone to catastrophic ruin so that we, in the audience, may tap into our nobler, higher minds and see the worthy human being beneath the frightful exterior.” The film is adapted from a play by Samuel D. Hunter, which I first read a decade ago, before its acclaimed Off Broadway run, at Playwrights Horizons, starring the actor Shuler Hensley in a bulbous bodysuit. (The New Yorker’s John Lahr, in his review, praised Hunter’s “promise as a bold theatrical storyteller.”) On the page, the play transported me into Charlie’s mind, where I could share his yearning for connection; his voice, not his bulk, was what tugged at the imagination. Onscreen, his body is a special effect, and the camera can’t help but take pride in the craftsmanship. Aronofsky, no stranger to visceral body horror (“Black Swan,” “The Wrestler”), is faithful to the play, but cinematic realism—the flesh made literal—creates an ogling effect. In “humanizing” Charlie, Aronofsky seems to want to repel the viewer so that we can pat ourselves on the back for finding the man in the monster. But is that empathy or pity?

Aubrey Gordon, a podcaster and author (“What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat”), has been anticipating the movie’s release with dread. “The impression that I’ve gotten from pretty much every fat person I know has been, like, just hunker down and wait for this to be over, because it’s going to be awful,” she told me recently. She hadn’t seen “The Whale,” but she had bought the play when she heard about the film. Gordon, who is part of a movement to embrace rather than pathologize fatness (including reclaiming the word “fat”), hadn’t responded to the script as I had. “The points that it is making about fat people are not distinguishable to me from the points that are made on ‘1000-Lb. Sisters’ or ‘My 600-Lb. Life,’” she went on. “The overwhelming vibe here was: Look at this wretched fat person who is doomed to die young! If only he’d gotten his shit together! It’s not actually a radical or edgy thing to say, like, ‘Oh, don’t you feel bad for this fat guy who’s definitely going to die alone?’ That’s the hand narrative about fat people.” Recalling the nineteen-nineties and two-thousands era of Hollywood fat-suit comedies, Gordon said, “People will say we’ve really moved past ‘Shallow Hal’ and ‘Norbit’ and ‘The Nutty Professor.’ I think it’s getting more entrenched. Now it exists in prestige world.”

When I spoke to Samuel D. Hunter, who adapted his play for the screen, he recalled those same fat-suit comedies with a shudder. “Maybe subconsciously that was one of the reasons I wanted to write this, because I was just sick of seeing that deployed so often,” he said. A sensitive forty-one-year-old, Hunter grew up in Idaho, where nearly all his plays are set, and attended an evangelical Christian school, where he was outed as gay in eleventh grade. “When I got to college, I just started falling deeper and deeper into depression, and—this is not everybody—but for me personally it manifested in pretty rapid weight gain throughout my early twenties.” He lost the weight over the next ten years, he said, thanks to the support of his parents, a therapist, and his partner. In 2009, when he started writing “The Whale,” he was teaching an expository-writing class at Rutgers and “desperately trying to connect with my students,” he recalled. “At one point, I just begged them to write me something honest. And one of my students wrote a line that ended up in the play and in the movie, which was: ‘I think I need to accept that my life isn’t going to be very exciting.’ ”

By the time the play was produced, in 2012, Hunter was shedding “the final pounds that I had been carrying around,” he said. “When I lost the weight, I was shocked at how much nicer people were to me in general, like cashiers or people on the street. And gay men, I should say. It was really, really jarring.” Charlie’s obesity grew out of Hunter’s lived experience, but also out of worst-case speculation. “What would happen to me if I hadn’t turned that corner? If I didn’t have the support system? I was looking at the way I was gaining weight back then and how rapidly it was happening—I was, like, ‘This could have been me.’ ” Aronofsky saw the Off Broadway production and immediately showed interest—onstage in Toronto, he said that he was attracted to the play’s “rich, human characters”—but it took nearly a decade for the film to get made, in part because of casting . Aronofsky mentioned Fraser early on, but it wasn’t until early 2020 that the actor did a reading of the script, in the East Village, and “there was no question as to who could best tell this story,” Hunter recalled. “He’s able to navigate the sadness through hope.”

Contemplating the audience’s potential revulsion, Hunter told me, “I do think that, when people bring in certain prejudices or preconceptions, Brendan’s performance and, hopefully, the depth of this character start to melt that all away.” But even the fact of putting an actor in a fat suit is a trope too far for some viewers. “So long as fat people are being represented by half a puppet, you’re never going to be able to see that character as wholly human,” the actor and comedian Guy Branum told me. Like Gordon, Branum had not seen the film but had read the play in anticipation. “Some people I really respect were telling me what a great and beautiful play it is,” he recalled. “But, you know, it’s a play that opens with somebody who’s not that much fatter than me almost masturbating himself to death. And it just sort of goes from there.” In the gay rom-com “Bros,” Branum plays the main character’s saucy sidekick, a bon vivant who goes to parties and cracks wise. “The Whale,” in contrast, has turned fatness into what Branum called “a metaphor for gay pain,” unable to imagine a life for its protagonist beyond “being locked in a sad apartment eating KFC.”

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Categories
Health

Eating 400 calories a day from these foods could raise dementia risk by over 20%

Talk about food for thought.

A growing body of research suggests that ultra-processed foods like frozen pizzas and breakfast cereals high in sugars, fats and empty calories are bad for your health. Now, a new large-scale study presented at the 2022 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in San Diego this week offers more evidence that people who get a high percentage of their daily calories from ultra-processed foods are also at a higher risk of cognitive decline.

A team of researchers from the University of São Paulo Medical School in Brazil followed a diverse sample of more than 10,000 Brazilians for up to 10 years. The subjects filled out food frequency questionnaires to note how often they were eating foods including: unprocessed or minimally processed ingredients (aka whole foods like fresh, dry or frozen fruits, vegetables, whole grains, meat, fish and milk that underwent minimal processing, like pasteurization); processed foods (canned fruits, artisanal bread and cheese, and salted, smoked or cured meat or fish); and ultra-processed foods (industrial formulations of processed food substances like oils, fats, sugars, starch, artificial flavors and colorings, but containing little or no whole foods).

The subjects also took cognitive tests up to three times a year, including memory tests and word recognition tests, to monitor their cognitive functioning; aka, mental abilities such as learning, thinking, reasoning, remembering, problem-solving, decision-making and attention. They also took regular verbal fluency tests to track their executive functioning; aka the mental skills that help an individual plan, monitor and successfully meet their goals.

The findings? Those who ate 20% or more of their daily calories from ultra-processed foods had a 28% faster rate of cognitive decline, and a 25% faster rate of executive function decline, compared to the subjects in the study who ate the least amount of processed foods. In other words, someone following a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet who consumed 400 of their daily calories from ready-to-eat frozen meals, processed meats, breakfast cereals and sugar-sweetened beverages each day saw a faster rate of cognitive decline .

Opinion: Your diet isn’t just making you obese, it could be speeding up cognitive decline

And many of us are fueling ourselves with these ultra-processed foods. The researchers noted that a whopping 58% of the calories consumed by US citizens come from ultra-processed foods. We’re not alone; 56.8% of the calories consumed by British citizens, 48% of the calories consumed by Canadians, and up to 30% of the calories eaten by Brazilians also typically come from these ultra-processed foods, the researchers added. And despite the rise in plant-based alternatives (some of which are highly processed, themselves) and poultry consumption — and a dip in buying and eating unprocessed red meat — another recent report noted that Americans are still eating as much processed food as they did two decades ago, particularly deli meats, sausage, hot dogs, ham and bacon.

Related: Putting less sugar in packaged foods could prevent millions of Americans from getting sick — and save the US over $160 billion

But there was an interesting catch in the cognitive decline study: If the overall quality of a subject’s diet was otherwise very high (meaning they ate a lot of unprocessed whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins), then this association between ultra-processed foods and dementia disappeared. So the good news is, you can counter consuming these often cheap and easily-accessible ultra-processed foods by cooking more at home (which can also save you money) and preparing your food with whole foods like fresh or frozen produce, whole grains and lean meats and proteins.

“Limiting ultra-processed food consumption, particularly in middle-aged adults, may be an efficient form to prevent cognitive decline,” the researchers wrote in their findings published in the journal JAMA Neurology this week. Indeed, this aligns with what health officials such as the American Heart Association have been saying: rather than calling out “good” or “bad” individual foods, folks should focus on eating an overall healthy diet that is high in fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean/high-fiber proteins that are minimally processed.

Read more: No more ‘good’ vs. ‘bad’ foods: 10 healthy eating ‘patterns’ to prevent heart disease and death

But brain health isn’t the only concern when it comes to ultra-processed foods. Here are four other ways that these ready-made meals and snacks can hurt your health.

Processed foods raise your risk of heart disease

An analysis of almost 30,000 people published in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal in 2020 suggests that eating two servings of red meat and processed meat each week – such as two hot dogs or four pieces of bacon – was “significantly associated” with heart disease.

“It’s worth trying to reduce [consumption of] red meat and processed meat like pepperoni, bologna and deli meats,” wrote senior study author Norrina Allen, associate professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Researchers from the University of Paris collected data on the diets and health of more than 105,000 people aged 18 and up over the course of five years for a 2019 report. They found that those who ate the most “ultra-processed” foods had a greater risk of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular issues.

The American Heart Association also released a new scientific statement last year focusing on overall healthy eating habits to protect your ticker, which included choosing minimally-processed foods (such as a bag of salad or roasted, unsalted nuts) rather than ultra-processed foods ( such as sugary cereal, potato chips or smoked sausage) as much as possible. The dietary guidelines also recommended limiting the consumption of food and beverages with added sugars. And it suggests choosing or preparing foods with little or no salt.

Processed foods increase cancer risk

People who had a 10% higher intake of ultra-processed foods saw more than a 10% increase in risk for cancers including breast cancer, according to a 2018 study published in the peer-reviewed British Medical Journal.

So when the American Cancer Society updated its diet recommendations to prevent cancer in 2020, cutting out processed foods was high on the list – along with curbing the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, red meat and alcoholic beverages. The American Cancer Society recommended piling your plate with a variety of whole, unprocessed foods and vegetables, instead; particularly dark green, red and orange veggies, as well as fiber-rich vegetables like beans and peas. The guide also promoted whole grains, whole fruits in a variety of colors, and overall foods that are “high in nutrients in amounts that help achieve and maintain a healthy body weight.”

Processed foods lower life expectancy

So considering the reports suggesting processed foods are associated with a host of chronic health conditions like cancer, heart disease and dementia – not to mention obesity, as those who follow an ultra-processed diet could consume up to 500 more calories per day compared with those who consumes whole foods – it shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise that research has also found a link between eating these foods and early death.

Researchers at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, ​​Spain documented the dietary habits of more than 20,000 Spanish college graduates between 1999 and 2014. They found that people who frequently consumed heavily processed foods (as in, more than four servings of each per day) had a 62% increased risk for early death compared to those who indulged in these foods less often.

And the 2020 study that noted eating two servings of red meat and processed meat each week was linked with heart disease also found that consuming these tasty but risky foods was also “significantly associated” with death. In fact, people who ate two servings of red meat or processed meat a week — but not poultry or fish — were linked with a 3% higher risk of all causes of death.

Processed foods hurt the planet – and come back around to bite you

Favoring the growth and production of processed foods – which often rely on the same handful of staple ingredients such as sugar cane, corn, rice and wheat – has resulted in killing off more diverse plant offerings. This impacts agrobiodiversity—or the variety and variability of animals, plants and microorganisms used directly or indirectly for food and agriculture, which affects soil health and farming’s long-run profitable resilience, according to research published in BMJ Global Health earlier this year. What’s more, producing ultra-processed food uses large quantities of land, water, energy, herbicides and fertilizers, which hurts the environment by emitting greenhouse gas and creating tons of packaging waste.

Read more: Processed foods like ramen packets and frozen pizza can hurt your heart — and the globe, study says

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Categories
Business

Amgen says experimental obesity drug has promising durability

LOS ANGELES, Dec 3 (Reuters) – Amgen Inc’s (AMGN.O) experimental obesity drug demonstrated promising durability trends in an early trial, paving the way for a larger mid-stage study early next year, company officials said ahead of a data presentation on Saturday.

The small Phase I trial found that patients maintained their weight loss for 70 days after receiving the highest tested dose of the injected drug, currently known as AMG133.

Amgen shares have gained about 5% since the company said on Nov. 7 that 12 weeks of trial treatment at the highest monthly dose of AMG133 resulted in mean weight loss of 14.5%.

At 150 days after the last dose, maintained weight loss had dropped to 11.2% below original weight at the start of the trial, according to findings detailed at a meeting of World Congress of Insulin Resistance, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Los Angeles.

Patients treated with AMG133 did have side effects including nausea and vomiting, but most cases were mild and resolved within a couple of days after the first dose, Amgen said.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 40% of the US population is obese, costing nearly $173 billion annually. It is a primary cause of type 2 diabetes and been linked to heart disease, certain cancers and other health complications such as more severe COVID-19.

The weight loss field has gained renewed medical and investor attention in recent months after diabetes drugs from Eli Lilly and Co and Novo Nordisk (NOVOb.CO), known as semaglutide and tirzepatide, were proven to help obese patients lose weight.

Both of those drugs, which need to be injected every two weeks, are designed to activate GLP-1, a hormone that triggers the feeling of fullness in the body after eating.

Amgen’s AMG133 also targets GLP-1, but has a dual mechanism which aims at the same time to block activity of a gene known as GIP.

The drug was developed from work at Amgen to identify genetic signals associated with lower fat mass and body weight, and also healthy metabolic profiles, explained Saptarsi Haldar, head of cardiovascular metabolic discovery at Amgen.

“Genetics clearly showed in multiple large populations that decreased activity genetically of the GIP receptor gene was associated with lower BMI (body mass index),” he said.

The California-based biotech said it plans to launch a larger mid-stage study of AMG133 early next year, which will enroll a broader range of patients, including those with additional health conditions such as diabetes.

JP Morgan analyst Chris Schott earlier this month said that if all goes well, a Phase III study of AMG133 could begin in 2024, with a launch expected in 2026 or 2027, if approved.

Reporting By Deena Beasley Editing by Bill Berkrot

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Categories
Health

Why eating potatoes could help you ‘lose weight with little effort’: study

Carb lovers join! This delectable starch, long a guilty pleasure, just might be a secret weapon when trying to “lose weight with little effort.”

Researchers have discovered the surprising health benefit of potatoes — as it turns out, these spuds are incredibly nutrient-dense and could be a crucial “part of a healthy diet,” according to a new study by researchers at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge , Louisiana.

The root vegetable has long been snubbed as too starchy for people with insulin resistance, and was once thought of as a contributor to type 2 diabetes. But the tater’s bad rap might be rectified now that scientists claim it can be part of the ideal diet.

This is great news for those who loaded up on grandma’s famous mashed potatoes over Thanksgiving, or who over-indulge in carbs at holiday feasts come December and New Year’s.

Because the starch is low calorie but very filling, researchers found that filling a plate full of potatoes can contribute to a shrinking waistline.

“People tend to eat the same weight of food regardless of calorie content in order to feel full,” professor Candida Rebello, a co-author of the study, told SWNS. “By eating foods with a heavier weight that are low in calories, you can easily reduce the number of calories you consume.”

The versatile root vegetable once gained a bad rap for diabetics and the obese, as it was previously thought to contribute to weight gain and insulin resistance.
Getty Images

The study included 36 people between the ages of 18 and 60 who were overweight, obese or had insulin resistance. Participants were given two different diets, both high in fruits and veggies and swapped 40% of the typical American meat consumption with beans, peas or potatoes.

Beans have been touted as a diabetes superfood, as doctors once crowned the vegetable the best at keeping blood sugars stable — but these researchers were putting that theory to the test.

“The key aspect of our study is that we did not reduce the portion size of meals but lowered their caloric content by including potatoes,” Rebello continued. “Each participant’s meal was tailored to their personalized calorific needs, yet by replacing some meat content with potato, participants found themselves fuller, quicker and often did not even finish their meal.”

Rebello’s buzz quote: “In effect, you can lose weight with little effort.”

Potatoes contain vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium, magnesium, folate and fiber, which all promote health, and have also been found to have antioxidants.

The potatoes were boiled — with the skins on — then placed in the fridge for 12 to 24 hours to maximize their fiber. The spuds were then included in lunch and dinner for the participants in the form of mashed potatoes, shepherd’s pie, wedges, salad and scalloped.

Upon nutrient comparison, scientists discovered potatoes were just as healthy as beans and peas.

“We demonstrated that contrary to common belief, potatoes do not negatively impact blood glucose levels,” Rebello stated. “In fact, the individuals who participated in our study lost weight.”

The study, which was published in the Journal of Medical Food, confirmed that people can still maintain a healthy diet and indulge in some potatoes, challenging what was previously believed about the once-damned starch.

side dish potatoes
The study is a godsend for carb-lovers, who wouldn’t dare give up their favorite side dish.
Getty Images
potatoes
The starchy spuds actually could shrink eager eaters’ waistlines.
Getty Images

“People typically do not stick with a diet they don’t like or isn’t varied enough,” the professor continued. “The meal plans provided a variety of dishes, and we showed that a healthy eating plan can have varied options for individuals striving to eat healthy.”

Obviously carb lovers can’t only chow down on potatoes, but foregoing them altogether also isn’t necessary. In fact, potatoes are “fairly inexpensive” and are easily incorporated into everyday meals.

Dr. John Kirwan, the study’s lead investigator and the executive director of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, used the study to research the effects of food on diabetes and obesity, saying there is more to know about “complex disease” and how to solve it .

“Obesity is an incredibly complex disease that we are tackling on three different fronts: research that looks at how and why our bodies react the way they do, research that looks at individual responses to diet and physical activity, and policy-level discussions and community programs that bring our research into strategies our local and global communities can use to live healthier lives,” he said. “These new data on the impact of potatoes on our metabolism is an exciting addition to the arsenal of evidence we have to do just that.”

.

Categories
Health

Why eating potatoes could help you ‘lose weight with little effort’: study

Carb lovers join! This delectable starch, long a guilty pleasure, just might be a secret weapon when trying to “lose weight with little effort.”

Researchers have discovered the surprising health benefit of potatoes — as it turns out, these spuds are incredibly nutrient-dense and could be a crucial “part of a healthy diet,” according to a new study by researchers at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge , Louisiana.

The root vegetable has long been snubbed as too starchy for people with insulin resistance, and was once thought of as a contributor to type 2 diabetes. But the tater’s bad rap might be rectified now that scientists claim it can be part of the ideal diet.

This is great news for those who loaded up on grandma’s famous mashed potatoes over Thanksgiving, or who over-indulge in carbs at holiday feasts come December and New Year’s.

Because the starch is low calorie but very filling, researchers found that filling a plate full of potatoes can contribute to a shrinking waistline.

“People tend to eat the same weight of food regardless of calorie content in order to feel full,” professor Candida Rebello, a co-author of the study, told SWNS. “By eating foods with a heavier weight that are low in calories, you can easily reduce the number of calories you consume.”

The versatile root vegetable once gained a bad rap for diabetics and the obese, as it was previously thought to contribute to weight gain and insulin resistance.
Getty Images

The study included 36 people between the ages of 18 and 60 who were overweight, obese or had insulin resistance. Participants were given two different diets, both high in fruits and veggies and swapped 40% of the typical American meat consumption with beans, peas or potatoes.

Beans have been touted as a diabetes superfood, as doctors once crowned the vegetable the best at keeping blood sugars stable — but these researchers were putting that theory to the test.

“The key aspect of our study is that we did not reduce the portion size of meals but lowered their caloric content by including potatoes,” Rebello continued. “Each participant’s meal was tailored to their personalized calorific needs, yet by replacing some meat content with potato, participants found themselves fuller, quicker and often did not even finish their meal.”

Rebello’s buzz quote: “In effect, you can lose weight with little effort.”

Potatoes contain vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium, magnesium, folate and fiber, which all promote health, and have also been found to have antioxidants.

The potatoes were boiled — with the skins on — then placed in the fridge for 12 to 24 hours to maximize their fiber. The spuds were then included in lunch and dinner for the participants in the form of mashed potatoes, shepherd’s pie, wedges, salad and scalloped.

Upon nutrient comparison, scientists discovered potatoes were just as healthy as beans and peas.

“We demonstrated that contrary to common belief, potatoes do not negatively impact blood glucose levels,” Rebello stated. “In fact, the individuals who participated in our study lost weight.”

The study, which was published in the Journal of Medical Food, confirmed that people can still maintain a healthy diet and indulge in some potatoes, challenging what was previously believed about the once-damned starch.

side dish potatoes
The study is a godsend for carb-lovers, who wouldn’t dare give up their favorite side dish.
Getty Images
potatoes
The starchy spuds actually could shrink eager eaters’ waistlines.
Getty Images

“People typically do not stick with a diet they don’t like or isn’t varied enough,” the professor continued. “The meal plans provided a variety of dishes, and we showed that a healthy eating plan can have varied options for individuals striving to eat healthy.”

Obviously carb lovers can’t only chow down on potatoes, but foregoing them altogether also isn’t necessary. In fact, potatoes are “fairly inexpensive” and are easily incorporated into everyday meals.

Dr. John Kirwan, the study’s lead investigator and the executive director of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, used the study to research the effects of food on diabetes and obesity, saying there is more to know about “complex disease” and how to solve it .

“Obesity is an incredibly complex disease that we are tackling on three different fronts: research that looks at how and why our bodies react the way they do, research that looks at individual responses to diet and physical activity, and policy-level discussions and community programs that bring our research into strategies our local and global communities can use to live healthier lives,” he said. “These new data on the impact of potatoes on our metabolism is an exciting addition to the arsenal of evidence we have to do just that.”

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